Classic Cars – A Guide to Buying Online

Buying a Classic Car requires thought, research and some planning. Classic cars are usually bought by enthusiasts to use and enjoy. It is not easy to make a profit from buying and selling classic cars.

Make a project plan and do your best to stick to it

You may see a tempting classic car restoration project listed in a newspaper or classic car magazine or on the Internet that may only be one or two thousand to buy and could be worth ten times as much once it is restored.

Practically though, have you the skills to carry out the restoration of the chassis, engine, interior, and the exterior ? If you need to find a specialist company to undertake some or all the work your ten times buy price may just come down to zero or very little profit indeed. Indeed in many cases the cost of restoration when added together will exceed the market value of the car. If you plan to keep the car and enjoy using it then this is perhaps an acceptable price to pay but do not expect to be able to sell the car at a profit particularly in today’s “credit crunch” economy.

Before you start looking – do you have enough storage space ? Do you have enough working area (remember once stripped down, the bits can take up an awful lot of space). No old car likes to be kept out in the open, not even with a plastic sheet to protect it from the rain, frost and snow and even the worst masochist won’t like working out in the open when it is blowing a gale! Lying on a cold concrete garage floor is bad enough but working outside in all elements usually puts a restoration project on hold permanently ! 

Where to look for your classic car.

Look in the your local newspaper, classic car magazines, the Internet or even just take a stroll down your street. There is no shortage of old cars to buy. But what if you are looking for something special? Well, let’s face it, these days the easiest place to look is on the Internet.

Go to Classic Lots (link below) and you will find thousands of classic cars from a rusty Mini for £100 to a Ferrari for £500,000. This excellent site also includes all the classic cars available on Ebay.

Once you have identified the car that you want, read between the lines and look at the background of the pictures.You can learn a lot from what is not said as well as the way a description is written.

I am always cautious when it says “selling it for a friend” and yet there is no contact number for the friend so you can make personal contact. When the subject of mileage is omitted from the specification box and the description… why?

Keeping in touch with reality is essential. IF IN DOUBT – CHECK IT OUT!!!! Answer those niggling questions. In the pictures you can see what looks like oil on the ground. Is it from the car you are buying? Is that mud or rust?

Ask yourself four questions. Why do I want the car? How much can I really afford? How far do I want to travel to view or collect it? and then the most important question of all… Do I really know enough about these cars to commit X thousands of pounds on a piece of pretty (or perhaps rusty metal)?

So, buying a classic car on an online auction? Well, I would advise you to adopt the following rules before commencing such an undertaking, and before you make a bid !

Remember if you are the highest bidder (assuming if there is a reserve that it has been met ) and you win the auction then you have entered a legal contract to buy that vehicle (providing the seller has described the vehicle correctly).

Do not expect to go to collect the car and having viewed it to be able to haggle over the price or to walk away. Buyer beware, and if at all possible always view the car in person before you place your bids. If do not feel confident in being able to asses the condition of your prospective purchase take along someone who has the skills to give you an honest opinion of the condition of the vehicle. You may also wish to consider using the AA or RAC who both provide professional pre-purchase inspections – if the seller seems reluctant to allow this inspection walk away !

Viewing the car before bidding

If you have decided to go and see the car then arrange a viewing and if for any reason you can’t make it, let the seller know, it’s only courteous not to waste their time just as you don’t want them wasting your time.

Things to take: a jack, perhaps some axle stands for safety, a torch, gloves and at the very least, a list of points you want to look at.

When you get there take a quick look around. Has the car been kept outside or has it been garaged, this can give you a good indication of the condition you can expect of the body and or chassis. Are there other rotting hulks just lying around, maybe the seller just buys any old junk they can find and try selling it on, not much chance of the car you have come to see having had a service any time recently.

Take a walk around the car and look for the tell tale signs of sagging which could indicate suspension problems or perhaps chassis problems. Do the doors and panels line up correctly, another indication of chassis problems or perhaps the car has had a bump at some time. Is it even one car or was it once two? Any repairs? Have they been completed well or have the repairs been bodged? Do the tyres match? What condition are they in? Check for rot in the body or in fibre glass cars/panels, look for stress cracks. Check the areas which are most prone to rot ie. arches, sills, doors, boot and bonnet. There are many different types of panels that can be used to effect repairs on a car and because of this the quality of repairs can vary.

Check inside the car. Windows, front and rear screen, are any of them leaking? Is the headlining damaged or dirty? Lift the carpets where you can, check for water and any rot, maybe even holes in the floor? Check the floorpan and joints, don’t forget inside the boot, the floor and spare wheel area. If you are happy so far with the body etc. try the engine (you did check all around the engine compartment didn’t you?). Will the engine start from cold? If the engine is already warm perhaps the seller is trying to hide something, maybe cold starting problems, maybe he had to get a jump start or a tow just to get it going? Listen for any knocks, look for smoke. If you see blue smoke on startup that quickly clears it could mean the valves are tired and leaking oil into the combustion chambers. If the smoke does not clear that could indicate a very tired engine, something that will have to be added to the budget, not only for investigation but for the repairs.

Clouds of steam on startup could indicate a blown head gasket or even a cracked cylinder head. Remove the radiator cap and look for “goo”. It is cross contamination and a good giveaway of cylinder head problems. Black smoke, probably just an over rich mixture but could just as easily be a worn carburetter.

Knocking. Well, it could be for a number of reasons, light tapping on the top of the engine could be a worn camshaft or a small end on its way out. Knocking from underneath could be a big end bearing breathing its last. An expensive repair. A rumbling noise could be a main crank shaft bearing on its way out, yet another expensive repair. Check the various hydraulic fluids and water levels. Look for any stains around the compartment and on the engine. Does the radiator smell of anti-freeze? Is there any oil lying around? Not a good sign. Keep the engine running for a while, some problems won’t show up until the engine is warm. If the car is driveable, take it for a spin. How does it “feel” on the road, does it “pull” to the right or left? Is the clutch “spongy” or firm? Does braking throw the car into oncoming traffic? (eek!) Wiggle the steering wheel, any clunks? When you accelerate does the car lurch in any particular direction?

OK so far so good. Now, the car may be 20 or 30 years old so it is not going to have all original parts. Brake shoes, clutch, spark plugs, points etc.. if they are the original parts, they are not going to be working very well by now! But seriously, if you are looking at an older car, does it have any of the original panels? Is the interior original? These points can add value to the car but the seller may try to pass off parts which were made last year in China as “original parts”.

Check the paper work. Does it have all of the required paperwork with it? Check the logbook, a very good place to start and don’t be fobbed of with “We have just moved house and can’t find it at the moment, I will post it on to you..”. Never buy a vehicle without a logbook unless you know exactly what you are doing. It is also useful to have any old MOT certificates and any receipts are good as well.  

Valuing classic cars.

How much to pay? Well, the actual value of a classic car will vary considerably. It depends on condition, make, model, year and of course, what is it worth to you? Just how much would you pay to have that special car sitting on your drive at home?

Be realistic! Just because you can isn’t a good enough reason to buy a chassis of a 1926 Rolls Royce if you have no idea where to get the rest of the car and no idea of what to do with the parts if you can get them. Providing you followed the advice above on checking the car over, you should have a good idea of whether you are bidding for a car you can drive away or one that will take months before it even has wheels.

If you read the magazines, talked to the owners club and browsed the Internet to get a good idea of what your aimed for car is selling for, then you should have a price in mind that you will pay for the car depending on its condition.

Most classic car insurance policies include an agreed value based on the market value of the car. At the end of the day, it is up to you and your budget. If you feel happy with what you have paid for your car then that is all that matters.

The basic rules for Internet Auctions.

Identify what you want – and have some idea how much you want to pay. Set a budget

only you know what you can afford to spend, or borrow. Use classic car magazine price guides and real adverts to see what your classic will cost to buy. Ideally hold back 10 percent to cover any unexpected problems. Calculate running costs by looking at mpg figures. Get insurance quotes: classic cars can be covered on cost-effective limited-mileage policies and are often surprisingly cheap to insure. Remember also that pre 1972 vehicles also have no road fund licence to pay. Talk to owners about how costly your classic will be to run.

Join the owners club. A huge resource of expertise can be found in owners clubs. Not only will they have some of the best looked-after cars but they have huge amounts of knowledge on the subject of buying and running your chosen classic. They often have cheap insurance and parts schemes, too.

Get an anorak ! No really – buy some books on your chosen classic, read magazines and become a classic-car bore. Research on the Internet and visit Classic Car Shows to talk to owners. You can never know too much.

Select a range of examples available… and do not let the cash burn a hole in your pocket. There are thousands of cars for sale every day so be patient, if it is not there today, it will be soon.

Check the sellers location – are you prepared to travel to inspect and then collect the car if you win the auction. Do you need to consider the cost of having your new pride and joy collected by a car transport service or could you hire a trailer and collect it yourself ?

Check out the seller. Read all the feedback for the last three months, negative feedback should ring alarm bells Ring him/her and get to know about your seller. Why is it being sold etc. Things like “Why are you selling the car?”, “Does it come with any spare parts?”, “How long have you had it?”, “Is there any rot?”, “Does it have any history?” MOT’s, receipts etc. can be helpful for the rebuild. If you know any specifics about the car you are enquiring about then ask any of the questions you feel you need answers for. It could save you a long drive and time away if you have the necessary information before you leave.

If a vehicle has less than 3 months MOT ask the seller if they would be willing to send the car for a fresh MOT – to correct an MOT failure could be expensive.

In the event of a car being sold as an MOT failure, ask the seller to specify the list of failures, then give your local garage a ring and ask them to give you a quote for the work that needs to be carried out. this will give you some idea of the costs involved in getting the vehicle through its MOT It will save you time and money in the long run, no point in bidding on a vehicle that is going to be to costly to put back on the road.

Keep copies of all emails sent and received between you and the seller. they will come in handy if a dispute or conflict arises over the description of the item or any promises the seller makes you.

Check if the seller is a private individual or a dealer – there are many people who buy junk from car auctions and then simply try to pass them off as their own vehicles for a quick profit.

If the seller is a trader passing themselves off as a private seller and they are willing to lie about their status what else are they willing to lie about!!

If the vehicle is being sold by a private seller, ask them how long they owned the vehicle for? is the logbook registered in their name and at their home address? if it is a genuine private sale, then the answers to the above questions should be yes!! if the answer is no to any of the above walk away.

A few examples of the excuses usually given by traders posing as private sellers for not having the vehicle registered in their name “I bought the car for wife/husband or family member and they don’t like it” “insurance to high” (people will usually always get an insurance quote before buying a car)”wife/husband did not like the car” “too big or too fast” or “they failed their driving test” “I bought the car as a stop gap”

ring any bells? I am sure you have heard at least one of the above and I have heard them all.

Remember it is a Legal Requirement to register a vehicle in your name regardless of how long you intend on keeping the car.

A reputable trader should and will disclose the fact that they are a trader, remember if you buy through the trade they may have certain obligations to rectify any problems with the car.

In the event that you have bought the car without prior inspection, before you go to collect the car, print out the item page and take it with you. If the seller has mis- described the item in anyway, you will have proof in your hands to argue your case.

If buying from a private seller, always meet the seller at their home address which should match the address the car is registered at. If there is a problem at least you will have an address to go back to. Do not agree to “meet on the Tesco car park as it will be easier than finding my house “

When you go to collect the vehicle if you are unsure about the vehicle or the seller walk away. Never part with your hard earned money until you are satisfied.

Once you have handed your money over, you will not be able to get it back! If you have not viewed the car do not pay prior to collection, if you do you will have little choice but to take the car away or lose all your money.

What’s the worst that can happen if you walk away? the seller will give you negative feedback. its better to have one negative feedback than a car which is going to cause you lots of problems and cost you time and money. You can always argue your case with the online auction site and you may get the feedback comment removed.

As a winning bidder you have a legal obligation to complete the transaction,however the seller has a greater obligation to be honest about themselves and the item they are selling. If the seller has misdescribed the vehicle and you do not complete the transaction they are very unlikely to take legal action against you for not completing the deal. Remember however if you simply change your mind and walk away without good reason the seller may take steps to recover the money from you.

The basic rules apply even if you are buying from a trader or private seller if something sounds to good to be true then it usually is !!!

I hope that you have found this guide helpful and that using this advice when purchasing a classic car online will help you to avoid the pitfalls and hopefully you will end up with a classic car to use and enjoy over the coming years.

Exclusive Car Detailing Services

The best car detailing service providers should be able to offer friendly services, attention to detail, honesty, and value. It is also very important that the needs of the customers be placed first at all times.

It is also essential for such a car detailing service provider to be fully covered or insured. The services that you can get include headlight restoration, machine polishing, and cutting. Engine detailing, rubbers and plastic rejuvenation and restorations, leather conditioning and cleaning, upholstery and carpet disinfection and shampoo extraction, exterior and paint finish treatments, and high-pressure cleaning.

What is car detailing?

Car detailing is the performance of thorough finishing, restoration, and cleaning of a vehicle to come up with the highest level of cleanliness as well as polish. The car detailing can be done on the interior and/or the exteriors of the automobile.

Professional services, as well as product sales to hobbyists and professionals, are a representation of a high presence commercially where the vehicles are the primary transport mode. This industry enjoys a very high revenue as compared to other auto areas.

The components

Car detailing can be split into the interior or exterior categories. There are some services and products that focus on the specific areas. Exterior detailing usually involves the restoration and cleaning of the finish on the car surface. This usually has to do with paint followed by a glossy finish. It also has to do with all the visible components on the exterior of the vehicle, including the tires, the wheels, the windows, and even the chrome trim.

When handling the exteriors, many techniques and products are used and this is usually based on the surface of the vehicle as well as the condition. It also has to do with the preference of the detailer. Products used include polishes, waxes, detail clay, detergents, and acid-free degreasers. All these have a role and others may be included in such cases. For thorough work, including towels, brushes and all sorts of applicators are needed.

Interior detailing usually deals with deep clean of the entire cabin interior. The interiors of the vehicle comprise things such as plastics, carbon fiber composites, natural fibers, leather, vinyl, as well as carpet upholstery made of synthetic fibers. So as to handle all these materials, a variety of products and techniques need to be applied. Vacuuming is actually standard. The stains in upholstery can be easily removed by the use of foam chemicals, liquid chemicals, or even steam cleaning. The surfaces that are nonporous can also be polished.

The auto body

The detailing process is extensive, but normally, it does not include any corrective actions like the repair of the body especially when they are major. It is restricted to paint restoration through dial action or a polisher that eliminates any swirl marks.

Detailing is now an existing business venture and it is growing fast. Many people are now finding it a lucrative opportunity for purposes of investing. You need to choose a car detailing service provider who is experienced and one who offers the best services.

How Much is My Car Worth?

Car Price Guides

Whether you’re considering trading your car through a dealership, selling it privately, refinancing it, or if you simply want to know what it’s worth, chances are you’ll be counting on a car price guide to assign a fair value to your vehicle. Car price guides can be accessed at the library, credit unions or banks, car dealerships, and online.

While that sounds easy enough, you might be surprised to discover the amount of information that is taken into consideration in determining the value of your automobile. Since a variety of car value guides are on the market, there may also be discrepancies that exist between one value guide and another. For this reason, it is up to the car’s owner to make sure that the car is valued at its maximum value.

Getting Started

While there are several car value guides available, the function of each is quite similar. Basically, you will begin by indicating why you are trying to place a value on your car. Used car values will vary based on whether the car is being traded, sold privately, or refinanced.

Identifying Your Car

Once you’ve identified the type of valuation needed, you will select the year, make, and model of your used car. Classic or antique cars are often classified separately. You will often be asked to select the vehicle’s trim package. Note that while an EX model might be a base model on one automobile, it might be the high-end model on another automobile. In selecting the trim package, many car owners make the mistake of guessing. This could result in assigning a less valuable trim to your car, thus reducing its overall value.

The next section of the car price guide will ask for specific information pertaining to your used car. The open-ended section of the requested information will include current mileage and your zip code. The zip code is required to determine the part of the country that you live in. Car prices and values vary from region to region.

Options and Upgrades

Following this section, you will likely find a checklist with all of the available options listed. You check off the features that your car has. This will include features such as power door locks, power windows, passenger side airbags, alloy wheels, leather, sunroof, and other components that are often considered options or upgrades. It is very important that features are not overlooked. It is a good idea to refer to the car’s original paperwork for this information. A car with a high number of extra features is referred to as loaded. A loaded car has a higher value than a base model car.

Indicating Your Car’s Condition

Finally, you will be asked to rank your car’s mechanical condition and appearance. Your choices will include:

  • Excellent
  • Good
  • Fair
  • Poor

A car with an excellent rating must run like new, and have no mechanical, body, or interior damage. All features and components must be in excellent working order. Repair and maintenance records are required.

In order for a car to be considered in good condition, the car must have little or no damage. Minor scratches and dings are acceptable. This car must be fully operable, without the need of any type of repairs.

Fair conditioned vehicles might need minor repairs and may have some body or interior damage. The damage should not impede the car’s ability to be driven.

Cars that need extensive cosmetic or mechanical repairs should be considered to be in poor condition.

Obviously, the better condition your car is in, the more the car is worth. Unfortunately, opinions often differ in this subjective analysis of a car’s condition. As an owner, be prepared to justify your position on the ranking you assigned to the car’s condition. This area has the most room for debate and the dealership or private buyer may try to convince you to lessen the value of your car based on their opinion of the car’s condition.

Results

Once this final step is completed, you will be directed to a chart that will indicate the fair value of your car. If you’re using an online car price guide, the website will list the fair value, without requiring you to refer to a chart.

How to Use the Results

Even though the first step was to clarify whether you were selling your car to an individual or trading it in at a dealership, most car value guides will still provide results for each scenario. In fact, many online pricing guides will even reveal what your car is worth if considered in excellent, good, fair, or poor condition. This overall snapshot of values can be used to help you decide whether to haggle or lose a deal over the condition of your car. In other words, if the dealer is offering to accept your car as a trade in good condition and you feel strongly that the car is in excellent condition, the value results may indicate a difference of such an insignificant amount that it may not be worth haggling over.

Quick Tips for Making the Car as Valuable to the Buyer as It Is to the Seller

If trading your car in at a dealership, cosmetic touch ups, such as those listed below, will usually will not add value to your car. However, when dealing with an individual in a private sale, these tips can make a big difference. Keep in mind, though, that the price of the repair, or touch up, should not exceed the value it adds to your car.

  • Keep all repair and maintenance records up to date.
  • Always maintain the condition and basic upkeep of your car. This includes oil changes, exterior washes, carpet care, and leather cleaner on the interior.
  • Get rid of odors with an air freshener designed specifically for automobiles.
  • If the car is especially unkempt, consider having it professionally detailed.
  • Replace worn, missing, or damaged floor mats with new, inexpensive mats.
  • Consider repairing loose headliners.
  • Repair and broken glass or cracked windshields.
  • Remove any bumper stickers or specialty tags.

Important Reminders

Always know what your car is worth before discussing the sale or trade with other parties. The dealership will often value a car at a significantly lower rate than the car is actually worth. Obviously, this is an attempt to make as much money on the deal as possible. Work as hard to save money as the dealership works to make money.

For a private sale, have a Carfax report available. Strangers are often suspicious, particularly if the deal seems too good to be true. The potential purchaser might think that the car was previously wrecked or otherwise damaged, so presenting a Carfax report may be helpful in this situation.

Your car may not sell at the price you think it’s worth. If the car does not sell after being listed for reasonable amount of time, decide whether you should take it off the market or reduce your price. Just because the car is valued at a price does not mean it will sell for that price. Factors such as the economy, similar cars listed in the area, and dealership promotions and rebates will have an impact on how easily your car sells.

The Science of Car Cleaning Products

In most cases you can clean and protect your vehicle with just a few basic car cleaning products. In this article you will learn some of the science behind auto detailing supplies so you can clean your car the right way.

Soil can be organic, non-organic or petroleum. That’s important to know. If you can identify the soil you’re dealing with you can use the right cleaner. When you use the correct cleaner most stains come out with ease.

Take organic soil as an example. Organic basically means that it contains carbon. Stains in this group include proteins, animal fat, body oil, mold, yeast, insects, bacteria and excrement. The classic example is the batch of hot French fries your three year old spilled on the back seat. That’s an organic soil stain.

Non-organic soil does not have carbon molecules. Most often we find these stains on the exterior the vehicle. A good example that frustrates most of us from time-to-time are water spots from minerals. Acid rain spots fall into this category, as well.

Finally we get to petroleum. These soils come from substances that do not contain or cannot be mixed with water. Motor oil, grease and road tar are the most common petroleum soils. Note that chewing gum is also a petroleum soil.

Now that you are aware of the three types of stains we can begin to discuss cleaners. Let me tell you, there are a lot of them. Unfortunately, no one has invented a true all-purpose automotive cleaner. Due to the many different surfaces and soils, automotive cleaners are complex mixtures of chemicals blended for a particular type of surface or soil. The most common chemicals used include surfactants, solvents, wetting agents, saponifiers and chelators.

Soaps and detergents are made using a surfactant. It’s an agent that has two compounds. One molecule is attracted to the soil itself, while the other loves water. The compound that’s attracted to water is a hydrophile. Its job is to surround the soil. The soil attracting agent is a hydrophobe. Its purpose is to break up the soil so the hydrophile can get to it and make it float away.

All cleaners needs a solvent of one sort or another to dissolve dirt and carry it away. Some solvents, including mineral spirits, work on petroleum soils and may be necessary on surfaces damaged by water. Did you know that the most common solvent used in cleaners is water?

Speaking of water, any solution that has a water base or mixes with water has a pH level. The term pH is merely a measurement of the relationship between hydrogen ions and hydroxyl ions. When you have more hydrogen ions than hydroxyl ions, that’s an acid. Likewise, if you have more hydroxyl ions than hydrogen ions it’s an alkali. Knowing this is important because any cleaner that falls at either end of the pH scale can cause serious damage.

The pH scale runs from 0 to 14. The lower half of the scale represents acids and the upper half represents alkalis. As you might have guessed, water is neutral and has a pH of 7.0.

If you know the pH of a cleaner you will know where you can use it. A carpet shampoo should have a pH around 8 or 9, whereas an all-purpose wheel cleaner should be between 12 and 14. Try using a cleaner made for wheels on your car’s fabric and carpet will make a pretty big mess.

Now that you know the basics you can better understand why there are so many car cleaning products and auto detailing supplies. Your vehicle has many different surfaces and they have different cleaning requirements. You can avoid using harsh cleaners by using basic protection. Wax the exterior several times each year and protect the interior with appropriate products. For the ultimate in protection, use an outdoor car cover or a waterproof car cover when you park outside.

Hand Car Wash

“Hand Car Wash” is a specialty of the Full-Service and Detail car wash systems. The highly automated car wash gets a personal cleaning touch when employees take a professional hand to shine your car. This personal touch ensures that no part of your car goes unnoticed by the machines and that no tiny particle of dust or slime sticks on to your car. Your car will come out sleek and shiny. Hand washing is a highly specialized and exclusive service that caters to a customer’s personal preferences for a car wash.

Hanna’s Hand Wash system, for example, has employees lined up in the conveyor inside the wash tunnel. When the automobile enters the conveyor, employees use hand-held high pressure wands to prepare the car for the wash and then clean the top and sides of the car. Only the bottom of the car is cleaned by their automated Undercarriage Applicator.

The Ace Hand Car Wash of Huntington Park, California, provides a range of detailing services for specific vehicles and to suit the requirements of individual owners. Their specialized services are highly client oriented and include washing, waxing, buffering, tinting windows, removing stains, and vacuuming carpets.

Services of the Bubbles Car Wash includes their Carpet Shampoo, which airs out carpets and cleans them with special chemicals; Tar and Paint Over Spray Removal, which is a special service that cleans even minute foreign particles on the surface of your vehicles; and half a dozen other specialized services.

Lake Car Wash has four types of hand car wash services, each of which comes with specialized features. Their Deluxe Hand Car Wash, for example, offers vacuuming the interior and dressing tires in addition to hand washing and waxing of the surface and the windows, while their Turbo Hand Wash comes with two coats of waxing, air fresheners, and undercarriage cleaning.

The Westbury Personal Touch hand car wash also has different combinations of car wash services to suit unique customer requirements. Their services include undercarriage washing, hand washing, body glossing and leather conditioning. They charge an average of $15 to $50 per car wash.